Sonoma State University 2018 Holocaust and Genocide Lecture Series

RESCUERS & SURVIVORS
Study the nature of hate: Prevent the escalation of prejudice into genocide

January 23: GENOCIDE, RESISTANCE AND RESCUE
Professor Emerita Myrna Goodman, Ph.D., Sonoma State University

January 30: PERPETRATORS ON THE PERIPHERY OF GENOCIDE: ITALIAN POLICE DURING THE HOLOCAUST
Alexis Herr, Ph.D., Saul Kagan Postdoctoral Fellow, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

February 6: THE HOLOCAUST, HISTORICAL LEGACIES, AND LOCAL POLITICS
Professor Evgeny Finkel, Ph.D., George Washington University

February 13: LILLIAN JUDD: SURVIVOR AND ACTIVIST (film)
Dennis Judd, Holocaust descendant

February 20: A SURVIVOR’S STORY
Hans Angress, Holocaust survivor

February 27: RESCUERS AND SURVIVORS IN THE ISRAELI CONTEXT
Professor Ziv Rubinovitz, Ph.D., Israel Institute Teaching Fellow, Sonoma State University

MARCH 6: THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE
Professor Sergio La Porta, Ph.D., CSU Fresno Armenian Studies Program

March 13: ARMENIAN GENOCIDE: LEGACIES OF SURVIVAL
Maral N. Attallah, Ph.D., Distinguished Lecturer, Humboldt State University

March 27: GENERATIONS OF MEMORY: VIOLENCE, ACTIVISM, AND MEMORY IN ARGENTINA
Prof. Kerry Whigham, Ph.D., Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University

April 3: BECOMING EVIL
Professor James Waller, Ph.D., Cohen Endowed Chair of Holocaust
and Genocide Studies, Keene State College

April 10: GENDER AND GENOCIDE
Professor Carol Rittner, RSM, Distinguished Professor Emerita,
Stockton University

April 17th: CAMBODIAN GENOCIDE
Julie Ea and Lucia Roncalli, M.D.

April 24: SYRIAN GENOCIDE
Professor David McCuan, Ph.D., Sonoma State University

May 1: AMERICAN GENOCIDE
Professor Benjamin Madley, Ph.D., UCLA

May 8: RWANDAN GENOCIDE
Her Excellency Mathilde Mukantabana, Rwandan Ambassador to the United States;
Simon Mudahogora, Rwandan Survivor; and Ndahiro Bazimya, Rwandan Genocide descendant


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Interests: Arts & Culture
Date: 
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 to Tuesday, May 8, 2018
Time: 
4:00 pm-5:50 pm
Location: 
Ives Hall (Warren Auditorium, ground floor)
Sonoma State University
1801 East Cotati Avenue


City: 
Rohnert Park
Cost: 
All lectures are free and open to the public. A daily parking permit ($5.00) is required at all times, but it is not valid in reserved lots. Permit machines accept cash and major credit cards.

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Organized By: 
Alliance for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide,
Co-organizers: 
The Holocaust Lecture Series is sponsored by the Alliance for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide, the Paul V.
Benko Holocaust Education Endowment, the Armenian Genocide Memorial Lecture Fund, the Adele Zygielbaum
Endowment, the Thomas Family Foundation, the Center for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide, the Sonoma
State Students’ Instructionally Related Activities (IRA) Fund, and the Jewish Community Federation (JCF) of San
Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties.
Event Contact Person: 
Barbara Lesch McCaffry
707.585.2291
Speakers: 
Myrna Goodman
Sonoma State University Professor Emerita of Sociology, Myrna Goodman is also the Director of the Center for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide. She is a graduate of Sonoma State University (B.A. Sociology 1988) and earned her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Sociology from the University of California, Davis. Professor Goodman's dissertation was an analysis of the contributions of ideology, culture and political process in the formation of the Danish Resistance Movement and the rescue of the Jews in Denmark during World War II. She taught at Sonoma State from 1990-2013.
Alexis Herr
Alexis Herr, Ph.D., Pearl Resnik Postdoctoral Fellow at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum taught at Keene State College as a professor of Holocaust and Genocide Studies from 2014-16. She received her Ph.D. from Clark University in 2014. While in residence this year at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, Professor Herr will expand her research on deportations in order to analyze the greater network of regional Italian officials’ involvement in enacting a complex system of persecution and deportation of Jews. This study proposes the first history of Italian perpetrators, and in doing so, challenges commonly held assumptions about the so-called brava gente (benevolent Italians) and complicates our understanding of Italian perpetrators on the periphery of genocidal killing.
Evgeny Finkel
Professor Evgeny Finkel of George Washington University, was born in Ukraine and grew up in Israel. He studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem for his B.A. degree. His M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are from University of Wisconsin-Madison. His dissertation was awarded the American Political Science Association Gabriel A. Almond Award for the best dissertation in comparative politics.

His research interests include political violence, genocide, East European and Israeli politics. Professor Finkel is the author of Ordinary Jews: Choice and Survival During the Holocaust (Princeton University Press, 2017). The work presents a new framework for understanding the survival strategies in which Jews engaged: cooperation and collaboration, coping and compliance, evasion, and resistance and focuses on three Jewish communities—Minsk, Kraków, and Białystok— to try to understand why Jews in these communities had very different responses when faced with similar Nazi policies.
Dennis Judd
Holocaust descendant Dennis Judd will introduce and discuss the recently completed film about his mother, The Lillian Judd Story.

Lillian Judd, was born in Uzhorod, Czechoslovakia. In 1938, when she was 14 years old, the Hungarians under Hitler occupied the city. In 1944, Lillian, her three sisters, and her parents were deported to Auschwitz after being housed in a brick factory for six weeks. Just before the Red Army liberated Auschwitz, she arrived at Bergen-Belsen where she and her sister were liberated. After moving to Sonoma County in in 1990’s she began to share her story with hundreds of young people and spoke frequently in this series. Lillian died on June 6, 2016.

Lillian’s son Dennis says that “the reality of the horror and atrocities that my parents went through continues on through me and my children. That extra layer of reality as the son of a survivor of the Holocaust that I carried in my childhood continues to impact me even today. I am very aware of the need to make the world a better place for everyone.”